Our Family Court System contributes to the problem of alienation in children

Parental Alienation Course Outline

Topics covered in this course will include:

  • How alienation begins
  • How children’s difficulties with transitions between parents can lead to psychological splitting and alienation
  • How our current system contributes to the problem of alienation in children
  • The signs of alienation and how to spot them
  • The psychological and emotional changes that create pressure on parents and children
  • The history of alienation and how social changes increase the likelihood of it happening to our children
  • High conflict separation and the risk of alienation for children
  • How alienating parents operate
  • How neuroscience is contributing to a deeper understanding of alienation and how to treat it
  • how to keep sane when your child is rejecting you
  • The importance of keeping fit and well
  • When to make strategic retreats
  • How to differentiate between the type of alienation your child is suffering
  • The importance of understanding your own parenting style
  • The impact that family history has upon the alienation
  • How to recognise and reverse an alienation reaction in your child
  • How to manage severe cases

for more information please go to:-https://fnf.org.uk/2-uncategorised/92-coping-with-parental-alienation-2-day-course

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Source: Coping with Parental Alienation – Parental Alienation

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THESE JUDGES SHOULD BE DISQUALIFIED!

SERIOUSLY?????

TWO TAMPA JUDGE CANDIDATES HAVING A FIGHT THAT BRINGS ON A 911 CALL?

PERHAPS BOTH OF THEM SHOULD BE DISQUALIFIED IMMEDIATELY!

ARE THESE THE TYPES OF PEOPLE WE WANT SITTING ON THE BENCH IN FAMILY COURT?

On a pretty fall afternoon last Sunday, the good citizens of Hills­borough County stopped by the Jan Platt Library in South Tampa to cast their early votes.

Outside, campaign supporters waved signs. Birds sang and children played. The scene was practically Rockwellian.

Until things got “loud,” “out of hand” and “ugly” — in the words of the poll worker who called 911.

And all of this was related to a race between two people running not in that bloodbath of a campaign for president, but to be a local judge.

Tampa lawyers Gary Dolgin and Melissa “Missy” Polo are vying for a circuit court seat — a prestigious post that pays $146,000 a year. Because judges are supposed to be impartial and dignified, the rules for running are different. Candidates do not generally talk issues, tout political parties or bad-mouth each other. They pretty much recite their respective resumes. I know — yawn.

So yes, a 911 call gets your attention. Things got ugly over at the library.

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